Instructions

Double-stick fusible web sheets (Lite Steam-A-Seam) general instructions:  These instructions may differ from those on the package. Use this method throughout the project for fusing, using a pressing cloth to protect fabric. Place rough-cut fabric right side down on a nonstick surface and fusible web sheet over the fabric, paper side facing up. With a dry iron, press them together for 8 to 10 seconds.  Peel off paper backing and cut out shapes.  Place the fused fabric shapes in desired position. Use a dry iron to set them in place. Turn over; use a steam iron on back to set the appliqué permanently.

Before starting Quilted Schoolhouse Sewing Craft download and print schoolhouse pattern and other patterns.

Sky and Grass Backgrounds

  1. Using rotary cutter with cutting mat, cut sky fabric 32-1/2-in. wide x 18-in high. Cut grass fabric 32-1/2-in. wide x 9-1/4-in. high.
  2. Place pieces right sides together, aligning one edge along the width. Stitch pieces together with a ¼ seam allowance; press open the seam.
Schoolhouse Siding Fabric

Keep the orientation of the fabric consistent throughout the fusing process.

  1. Using rotary cutter with cutting mat, cut a 14-1/2-in. strip (14-1/2-in. x 42/44-in.) from the schoolhouse siding fabric. (Do not remove selvages—they help in making a straight line for the siding.)
  2. Lay fabric on the ironing board wrong side up with one 14-1/2-in.-wide selvage edge at the top. Use fabric pen to mark this selvage “TOP”.
  3. Fold the top selvage down, wrong sides together, 1-1/2 in., and press the fold.
  4. Open the fold and align a piece of fusible tape along the full length of the fold line. Remove the paper backing from the tape and carefully fold the fabric over the tape. Following manufacturer’s instructions fuse the tape into place, making sure the tape doesn’t move.
  5. Lift the selvage up and away from you, with wrong side of the fabric facing up. Then fold the pressed pleat under, toward you.
  6. Bring the selvage edge (and fold) toward you. Measure ¼-in. from the previously fused edge and press a fold at this spot.
  7. Open the fold and align a piece of fusible tape along the full length of the fold line. Remove the paper backing from the tape and carefully fold the fabric over the tape. Following manufacturer’s instructions fuse the tape into place, making sure the tape doesn’t move.
  8. Repeat steps 5-7 using the full length of the fabric. Leave about 1-in. of fabric unprocessed, including the selvage. (Do not remove the bottom selvage.)

Sewing the Schoolhouse

  1. Pin enlarged schoolhouse pattern on the siding fabric, aligning dashed line at the bottom with the bottom row of the siding. The area below the dashed line may extend into the selvage. Cut along the bottom of the pattern. (Do not cut along the dashed line.)
  2. Stay stitch very close to the pattern edge around the entire perimeter. Remove pattern; cut the schoolhouse shape from the siding fabric, just outside the stay stitching. Set aside.
  3. From the paper pattern piece, cut out the door with the transom and steps as one piece. Then cut out both windows. (Do not cut the fabric yet.)
  4. Matching edges, place the schoolhouse pattern back on the schoolhouse fabric. With a pencil, lightly outline placement of the door with transom and steps and windows. Remove the paper pattern. Stay stitch close to the outside of placement lines.
  5. From fabric cut out the door with transom and step and both windows on the placement line, inside the stay stitching.

Sewing the windows and door with transom

  1. For each window, cut a 2-1/2- x 5-1/2-in. piece of white bottom-weight fabric and organza.  For the transom, cut a 2-1/2- x 2-in. piece of each fabric.
  2. For the stained glass window flowers, apply fusible web to the back as directed in the general instructions above and cut each out. (The flowers should be small enough to fit inside the placement ovals.)
  3. With black permanent marker, draw an oval frame for each flower as in photo. Using the placement ovals on the pattern as a guide, draw the frame shapes on the bottom-weight window and transom fabrics. Use a dry iron to set the ink.
  4. Center the flowers inside the drawn frames;  fuse in place. If desired, use black fabric pen to draw lighter lines from the flower to the frame, giving the appearance of leading. Set the ink with a dry iron.
  5. Matching edges, place a corresponding sized piece of organza over the window and transom bottom-weight fabric pieces. Use a 1/8-in. seam to sew each fabric set together around the edges.
  6. To make the window lattice stitching, first lightly mark a horizontal centerline across the width of each window fabric piece. Then lightly mark two horizontal lines 7/8-in. apart above and below the centerlines and two vertical lines 7/8-in. from the sides. Sew across the horizontal centerline on each window fabric piece from side to side.  Stitch again very closely to each side of the original centerline stitch, making it look like a wider line.  Stitch the two marked vertical lines and the four marked horizontal lines on each window fabric piece. (Stitch only once for vertical and horizontal lines.)
  7. To attach the two windows (excluding the transom above the door) to the schoolhouse fabric, first cut a 24-in. length of fusible tape. Cut the tape in half lengthwise, forming two 1/8-in. strips. Turn the schoolhouse fabric right side down. Place 1/8-in. tape strips around window cutouts perimeter, removing the paper as you go. Center each of the window fabric pieces right side down inside the window cutouts with edges overlapping onto the fusible tape. Use a pressing cloth and dry iron to fuse window fabric pieces in place. Stitch along edges to secure window fabric in place.
  8. To make the door, cut two 2-1/2- x 4-3/4-in. pieces of white bottom-weight fabric. Matching edges, place fabric pieces together and stitch 1/8-in. from the outer edge to join. Trim one short edge even close to the stitching for door bottom. Using a ¼-in. seam allowance, stitch the bottom of the transom to the top of the door. Finger press, then top-stitch seam in place. Trim seam close to topstitching.
  9. To attach the door with transom to the schoolhouse fabric, first cut a 24-in. length of fusible tape. Cut the tape in half lengthwise to form two 1/8-in. strips. Turn the schoolhouse fabric right side down. Place pieces of the 1/8-in. tape strips around door with transom cutout perimeter, removing the paper as you go.  Center the door with transom fabric piece right side down inside the cutout, with edges overlapping onto the fusible tape. (Door bottom should line up where the step cutout starts.) Fuse door with transom fabric piece in place. Stitch along edges to secure window fabric in place. Attach decorative button or stud on front of door positioned as seen in photo for doorknob.
  10. To trim the door and windows, from ¼-in. wide white grosgrain ribbon cut four 5-¼-in. lengths for each vertical window side, five 2-1/4-in. lengths for each horizontal window side and the door top, and two 5-3/4-in. lengths for each vertical door side. Cut all ribbon ends straight and treat with fray check. Let dry. Stitch coordinating-sized lengths of ribbon around perimeter of windows, door top and vertical sides of door. Stitch on each edge of the ribbon lengths, being sure to cover the stitching where the window door with transom meets the cutout edges. Overlap ribbon at corners. For bottom of door, allow ends of ribbon to fall below the door slightly and trim level with door bottom.

 Sewing the Sign

  1. Cut two 2-1/4- x 1-1/2-in. pieces of white bottom-weight fabric. Matching edges, use fusible web to fuse fabrics together. Follow general directions above.
  2. Use black fabric pen to write the words (line 1) “Wilbur” and (line 2) “Dist. No. 4” centered across the width of the fused fabric piece. Trim fused fabric to 2- x 1-1/4-in. Use black permanent marker to draw a thick line around perimeter. Use dry iron to set all ink.
  3. Center the sign 2-1/2 in. above the door. Stitch in place.

 Attaching Schoolhouse

  1. Cut a 12- x 7-in. piece of fusible web. Turn schoolhouse fabric right side down and place fusible web, paper side up, centered about ½-in. above the door bottom. Follow general directions above to fuse in place.
  2. Remove paper backing and carefully place schoolhouse fabric with fusible web backing right side up on the background fabric, about 3-in. from the right side and 3-in. from the bottom. Follow general directions above to fuse schoolhouse to background. Be sure to use pressing cloth to protect fabric.

 Crafting the Belfry

  1. Cut two 5-in. lengths from both widths of white grosgrain ribbon. Fuse a strip of fusible tape to the back of each ribbon piece. Remove paper backing.
  2. Lay ruler over schoolhouse roof peak; place the inner edge of the ½-in. wide ribbon lengths 2-1/4 in. from each side of the peak. Place lower ends of the ribbon under the edge of the schoolhouse roof.
  3. Fuse ribbon lengths in place, leaving the upper 1-1/2 in. of each end of the ribbons unfused to trim after the belfry roof is in place.
  4. Place the ¼-in.-wide ribbon lengths under the edge of the schoolhouse roof parallel with and inside of the ½-in. wide fused ribbon lengths. Leave ¼-in. of space between the ribbons. Fuse the ribbon lengths in place about halfway up.
  5. Apply fusible web on a rough-cut piece of black fabric for the bell.  Trace bell pattern onto fused black fabric and cut out shape.
  6. Center the bell about ½-in. above the peak of the schoolhouse roof and fuse it in place.
  7. Use belfry roof pattern to cut the shape from very dark-gray patterned fabric.
  8. Fuse the length of lace trim centered on the bottom edge of the belfry roof. Trim ends to match the roofline edges.
  9. Place lace for bell tower top under point on belfry roof pattern. Use fusible tape to fuse in place.
  10. Use the belfry roof pattern to cut a piece of fusible web the same shape. Trim the ends of the white grosgrain ribbons to fit under the belfry roof.  Use belfry roof shape fusible web to fuse the belfry roof and the ends of the ribbons in place.
  11. Cut a piece of fusible web about the size of the top portion of the schoolhouse and fuse it in place on top of the ribbon ends.

Sewing the Steps

  1. Cut a 1-7/8- x 4-1/2-in. piece of light-gray stone fabric for the upper step. Cut a ¾- x 4-1/2-in. piece of each dark-gray fabric and fusible web for the lower step.
  2. Following general directions above, fuse dark-gray fabric to fusible web. Remove paper backing. Then fuse the dark-gray fabric piece overlapping onto the light-gray fabric piece, aligning the bottom edges.
  3. Cut a 1-7/8- x 4-1/2-in. piece of fusible web. Center it on the back of the two-step unit and fuse it in place. Remove paper backing. Then lift the bottom edge of the schoolhouse and slide the two-step unit right side up under the schoolhouse. Align the bottom of the schoolhouse with the bottom of the dark-gray fabric. Fuse in place.
  4. Cut pieces of fusible web to fit under side widths of the bottom of the schoolhouse. Lift the bottom side widths of the schoolhouse and slide the fusible web pieces under.  Fuse in place and remove paper backing. Fuse the bottom edge of the schoolhouse to the background.
  5. Run strips of fusible tape around the edges of the schoolhouse. Remove paper backing and fuse to the background. Stitch in place.

Crafting the Schoolhouse and Belfry Trim

Use seam sealant on all ribbon ends, taking care not to drip on fabric.

  1. Cut two 10-1/4-in. lengths of wider white grosgrain ribbon. Fuse a strip of fusible tape to the back of each; remove paper backing.
  2. Starting at the top of each schoolhouse side, place a length of ribbon just over the edge, covering the stitching lines. Trim even with the bottom of the schoolhouse. Fuse ribbon in place; topstitch along both edges.
  3. Cut two 10-1/2-in. lengths of wider black grosgrain ribbon for the schoolhouse roofline. Fuse a strip of fusible tape to the back of each; remove paper backing.
  4. Starting at the bottom edge, place each ribbon along a roofline. Cut the ribbon parallel with the side. Cut the ribbon tops at an angle, forming a peak. Fuse ribbons in place.
  5. Cut two 5-1/2-in. lengths of thinner black grosgrain ribbon for the belfry roofline. Fuse a strip of fusible tape to the back of each; remove paper backing. Follow the instructions in Step 4 for placement and fusing.
Crafting the Flower Beds and Children
  1. Following general instructions above, attach fusible web to small flowers and flower pattern fabric for flower beds and stone patterned fabric for flower bed bases. Also attach fusible web to fabric with children. Cut out several small flowers for schoolhouse flower bed and around flower patterned fabric for larger freestanding bed. Cut out around children. Trace flower bed base patterns in reverse onto paper backing of stone patterned fabric and cut out shapes; remove paper backing.
  2. Arrange small flowers for schoolhouse flower beds, making sure bottom of flowers does not extend beyond the bottom of the schoolhouse fabric. Flower tops will overlap onto schoolhouse siding fabric. Fuse flowers in place.
  3. Place the two schoolhouse flower bed base fabric cutouts, overlapping the bottom of the small flowers and aligned with the bottom of the schoolhouse. The square ends should align with the edges of the bottom step. The curved end will extend past the edges of the schoolhouse sides. Fuse both flower bed bases in place.
  4. Put the flower pattern fabric cutout to the left of the schoolhouse as in photo. Then place the freestanding flower bed base, overlapping the bottom of the flowers. Fuse flowers with flowerbed base in place.
  5. Place the children between the freestanding bed and the schoolhouse as in  photo; fuse in place.

FINISHING

Layer backing fabric, batting and finished piece. Use a dark color for edge binding and quilt as desired.

FINISHED SIZE: Quilted Schoolhouse sewing craft is about 26 inches high x 31-1/2inches wide.

Quilted Schoolhouse Sewing Craft sent in by Jeanne Perrine of Jackson, Michigan.

EDITOR’S NOTE:  Jeanne notes that the Quilted Schoolhouse Sewing Craft was inspired by the 1860s Wilbur Schoolhouse, which she and her husband restored to serve as their home and her design studio.