What’s it Worth: Self-rising Flour Advertising Display

A product of Cadick Milling Co., this countertop advertising display dates to the 1800s.

What’s it Worth: Self-rising Flour Advertising Display

What’s it Worth: Self-rising Flour Advertising Display

What’s it Worth: Self-rising Flour Advertising Display

What’s it Worth: Self-rising Flour Advertising Display

 

I’m curious about this item, rescued from a general store and in my family for more than 20 years. It’s 15 inches tall, made of thin porcelain and notched in the base for an electric cord. Please tell me more.

B.T., Newville, Alabama

What’s it worth?

Your piece was designed as a countertop advertising display, promoting the products of Cadick Milling Co., Grand View, Indiana. The mill, built in the 1850s and sold to William Cadick & Son in 1883, shipped flour to the South on riverboats from two large warehouses overlooking the Ohio River.

Self-rising flour, though patented in 1845, was a fairly new concept—and homemakers were skeptical about not adding their own leavening agent. Cadick advertised heavily to establish its products, including eye-catching counter displays like this. Your illuminated flour sack is cleverly designed, with each side promoting different Cadick products. Its value is about $375.

—Barbara J. Eash (Country Woman Magazine’s Antiques Expert)

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